Friday, May 25, 2012

Quilting is the Best Medicine



I'd like to welcome back our former blog sister Terri Thayer as my guest blogber this week.


First, let me say it’s great to be back at Killer Hobbies. I’m waving to all my old friends here. Blowing kisses, too.

Quilting is the Best Medicine.

It says so right on the back cover of my latest, MONKEY WRENCH. Sometimes what appears on the back of your book can come as a surprise.

Back cover blurbs are an art form. The writer has to wrap up the plot in 100 words or less. He must be clever, funny, engaging. Can’t give the plot away. Don’t tell us who the murderer is (believe me, it has happened). Tell enough to entice the reader into wanting to read more. Maybe most importantly, that little paragraph needs to take the potential buyer and turn her (or him) into an actual buyer.

My back cover reads like this:

Dewey Pellicano’s quilt shop has earned a spot in the annual Quilter’s Crawl, and twenty-something employee Vangie has organized a trendy Twitter promotion to boost sales at the struggling store. But when Vangie’s boyfriend dies from an overdose, it’s up to Dewey to get her young staffer off the hook for homicide. Meanwhile, the store’s quilting teacher Pearl takes in a college-age “GrandSon” who turns out to be a real pill. As if Dewey didn’t have enough on her plate, she’s blamed when a customer is killed during a Twitter-induced stampede. Putting together the pieces to save her skin—and her store—is a real monkey wrench in Dewey’s murderously busy shop-hop weekend.

Pretty good, right? I think so. The writer (Andy Belmas) used meaty words like trendy, stampede and murderously. I love the description of the GrandSon as a “pill.” This book deals with prescription drug addictions so it’s a great play on words. I would like to read this book. Would you?

Back to that headline. I didn’t know Quilting is the Best Medicine was going to be on the back. Of course, I know that axiom to be true. I’ve known plenty of people who have gotten through a tough spot in their life by quilting. I’ve been known to work through a few issues myself. Making graduation quilts for my son and now my nieces and nephews has helped to ease the pain of a kid leaving home for the first time. For the kid and for me.

That premise, Quilting is the Best Medicine, is what my books are about. Everything about quilting is healing, although it might not always feel like that when you’ve broken your fourth needle. The repetition motion can put you in a meditative state. Sewing with friends can be healing. And finishing a work of art—or work of heart—can make your heart soar.

I know that Quilting is the Best Medicine. I’m just surprised back cover writer, Andy Belmas knew.

What is your Best Medicine? We’re all crafters here (or wannabes). What is the thing you reach for when you’re upset, frustrated, sad or just feeling out of sorts? The sewing machine? The crochet hook? Paints? Tell me your best remedy.

I’ll pick one commenter out to win a copy of Monkey Wrench.

I’m feeling kind of stressed. Think I’ll go sew.








http://www.territhayer.com











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26 comments:

Unknown said...

Do Oreos count as a hobby? No? Then I have to say collage. Fabric or paper. Something about handling small piecing of color and pattern and putting them together in a pleasing way. My mind just relaxes while I play. And there is no wrong way to do it.

Unknown said...

Do Oreos count as a hobby? No? Then I have to say collage. Fabric or paper. Something about handling small piecing of color and pattern and putting them together in a pleasing way. My mind just relaxes while I play. And there is no wrong way to do it.

Dru said...

My rotary to cut fabric square for a quilt project. I love taking fabric and watching a project grow.

Pam said...

Quilting is my best medicine. I have a very stressful job and quilting makes it bearable. I travel with miniature quilts to set my computer on so if things get crazy, I can touch the fabric and it takes me to my passion instead of only facing the problem at hand. Life would be sad without quilting!

RoseofSharonStudio said...

I quilt. But when I am upset, I cut out. Something most quilters do not like to do. But I love to cut. So I have a ton of PHD's (projects half done) around.
Thank you for the giveaway!

Joanna Campbell Slan said...

Old friends are a great medicine, too. Glad to have you back, Terri.

Linda O. Johnston said...

Welcome back, Terri! I'm always fascinated at how blurbs are created. The people who write them sure seem to get the gist of the story in a pithy and engaging manner. My best medicine? I'm sure anyone who knows me can figure that out: my dogs!

Terri Thayer said...

Rotary cutting is soothing - as long as your fingers are well out of the way. Thanks, Dru!

Terri Thayer said...

Love that, Pam. Traveling with a miniature quilt is a lovely idea. Our quilts helps us in so many ways.

Terri Thayer said...

Rose of Sharon, I can see how the cutting helps. Your mind has to pay attention to what your doing instead of what is happening around. Well done!

Terri Thayer said...

Old doggie friends, perhaps? Great to be back, Joanna and Linda!

Liz said...

My cancer support group uses art.

Alas, my skills have not progressed since I failed my second grade project, but some of my cohorts are truly talented.

Terri Thayer said...

Hi Liz,

I believe talent is not as important as effort. Being joyous in what you do, that's healing. Sounds like you found people who feel the same way. Good for you.

Shirley said...

I agree that quilting is very good medicine, even reading about quilting (or other crafts) mysteries is good medicine. Love your books and so glad to see that you have a new one out!

Becky said...

When I'm stressed, I read and read and read. My favorite craft is sewing quilt tops. Looking forward to your new book!

Julie said...

Knitting, every time. While waiting to have surgery on my spine, I was knitting on the gurney in my hospital gown and socks. The really good thing about knitting, crochet, and cross-stitch in a situation like that is its portability. I pick a project that's small, and something I can work without constantly referring to a pattern, and it really helps take the edge off.

Terri Thayer said...

Thanks, Shirley and Becky. We're all of the same mind. Reading and quilting, great stress relievers!

You are in the drawing, so stay tuned. I'll pick a winner soon.

Terri Thayer said...

Julie, love that image of you on the gurney, knitting! I bet you came through the surgery better than most. Thanks for the comment.

Terri Thayer said...

re

Lynn said...

I reach for chocolate more times than I care to say when I'm frustrated or mad. However I also reach for my knitting needles. Depending on the amt of bad mojo depends on the project. If I'm really mad and I just need to knit then it's a kitty shelter blanket. They dont care if the tension is correct or not. Then i'll move on to my socks. those pointed needles usually keeps others away!

Terri Thayer said...

And Lynn, it's hard to eat chocolate when your hands are full of knitting needles. Everyone wins!
Thanks!

treevillemary said...

Just sitting and looking at my (rather large) stash, imagining what will be or might be, is wonderful medicine for me......taking me away from the reality of life, at least for a little while.

Treevillemary said...

My rather large stash is my best medicine. Just going through it, looking at it, imagining what will be someday.......ah, a break from the real world.

Terri Thayer said...

Julie,

You are the winner! Please contact me with your mailing address. You can email me at terri@territhayer.com

Congrats! Thanks everyone for playing!

Terri Thayer said...

Hey Julie, Claim your prize! Email me at terri@territhayer.com

Terri Thayer said...

Hi everyone,

I haven't heard from our winner, so I picked a new one. If Julie gets in touch, she'll get a book, too. In the meantime, Rose of Sharon, come on down! You've won a copy of Monkey Wrench. Just email me. terri@territhayer.com to claim it