Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Love of Money

The chicken soup supper went off deliciously last Wednesday at St. George’s.  I did not allow enough time for the vegetables to cook, however, but my problem was very capably solved by my assistant Elizabeth, who suggested then helped me transfer the mix of chicken, water, chicken broth, herbs, onions, carrots and celery into two big pots we put on the stove to properly boil.  We added the spaetzle noodles, then transferred the soup back into the two very large crock pots in time (just in time) to begin serving at six pm.  The carrots were at that perfect state of a hint of al dente.  Got the recipe (for thirty!) off the Internet at JustAPinch. 

May I mention here a forthcoming event?  This coming weekend, March 16, 17, and 18, the Northwest Coin Club (of which I am a member) will be putting on a major coin event, The Money Show, in Minneapolis. One of the demonstrations will be how money was made in centuries past.  Literally, made. As in using a hammer to bang a pattern into a round piece of metal.  There will be lectures and an auction for the Boy Scouts.  There will also be a "bourse," a large room in which coins of many countries and eras (and prices) will be sold.  For an exhibit, I, myself, will bring my "1,000 Years of English Money" collection, in which the oldest coin will be from the reign of King Canute (crowned in 1016) and the most recent from the reign of Queen Elizabeth II.  There are a few gaps in my collection.  Anyone out there have a Harold II, an Anne, or a William and Mary?  Maybe I’ll find one at the show.

The location of the show is The Earle Brown Heritage Center, 6155 Earle Brown Drive, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. Y'all come!


Betty Hechtman said...

The money show sounds interesting. I never thought about how coins were made.

Monica Ferris said...

Coins made by striking rounds of gold or silver or copper are called "hammered," coins made by a machine are called "milled." The transfer of method between the two took place in England toward the end of the reign of Elizabeth I and during the reign of James I (early 1600s).